The mental health and well-being among partners and children of military personnel and veterans with a combat-related physical injury: A scoping review of the quantitative research

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Little research has focused on the impact of combat-related physical injuries on the mental health and well-being of partners and children of military personnel and veterans.

OBJECTIVES: This scoping review identifies the consequences of combat-related physical injuries (CRPIs) on the mental health and well-being of partners and children of military personnel and veterans.

METHODS: Quantitative articles examining mental health and well-being in partners and children of military personnel and veterans with CRPIs from the UK, US, Canada, New Zealand, Australia, European Union (EU), or Israel published since 2000 were identified.

RESULTS: Seven articles were included, six from the US. The findings indicate the potential negative and positive impacts CRPIs can have on the health and well-being of partners of military partners and the negative impacts identified among children, and how this differs from psychological injuries.

CONCLUSIONS: This scoping review highlights the lack of research focusing on the impact of CRPIs on the family members of military personnel and veterans. Additional research is needed to understand how psychological injuries might have different effects on the mental health and well-being partners and children of military personnel and veterans compared to different types of CRPIs.

Original languageEnglish
Article number101283
Pages (from-to)101283
JournalDisability And Health Journal
Volume15
Issue number3
Early online date15 Feb 2022
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2022

Keywords

  • Combat injuries
  • Military partners
  • Military-connected children
  • Occupational health

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