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The neuropsychological profile of children at high risk of developing an eating disorder

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The neuropsychological profile of children at high risk of developing an eating disorder. / Kothari, R; Solmi, F; Treasure, J; Micali, N.

In: Psychological Medicine, Vol. 43, No. 7, 07.2013, p. 1543-1554.

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Harvard

Kothari, R, Solmi, F, Treasure, J & Micali, N 2013, 'The neuropsychological profile of children at high risk of developing an eating disorder', Psychological Medicine, vol. 43, no. 7, pp. 1543-1554. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0033291712002188

APA

Kothari, R., Solmi, F., Treasure, J., & Micali, N. (2013). The neuropsychological profile of children at high risk of developing an eating disorder. Psychological Medicine, 43(7), 1543-1554. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0033291712002188

Vancouver

Kothari R, Solmi F, Treasure J, Micali N. The neuropsychological profile of children at high risk of developing an eating disorder. Psychological Medicine. 2013 Jul;43(7):1543-1554. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0033291712002188

Author

Kothari, R ; Solmi, F ; Treasure, J ; Micali, N. / The neuropsychological profile of children at high risk of developing an eating disorder. In: Psychological Medicine. 2013 ; Vol. 43, No. 7. pp. 1543-1554.

Bibtex Download

@article{616ffd9db7244693af197d4dbd66b919,
title = "The neuropsychological profile of children at high risk of developing an eating disorder",
abstract = "Background: There is a large body of evidence indicating that eating disorders (EDs) are characterized by particular neuropsychological profiles. We aimed to further explore whether impairments in neuropsychological functioning previously found in ED groups are present prior to onset, or are secondary to the disorder.Method: This is the first study to explore neuropsychological functioning in children born to a mother with a lifetime ED, who are therefore at high risk of developing an ED, in a large cohort sample. We investigated intelligence and attention at age 8 years (n = 6201) and working memory (WM) and inhibition at age 10 years (6192) in children who are at high risk of developing an ED, compared to children who are not.Results: The children of women with lifetime anorexia nervosa (AN) showed high full-scale and performance IQ, increased WM capacity, better visuo-spatial functioning, and decreased attentional control. The children of women with lifetime bulimia nervosa (BN) showed comparatively poor visuo-spatial functioning.Conclusions: Our findings suggest that high intelligence, increased WM capacity and impaired attentional control might be intermediate phenotypes on the pathway between genetic vulnerability and the development of an ED.",
keywords = "Anorexia Nervosa, Attention, Bulimia Nervosa, Child, Child of Impaired Parents, Cohort Studies, Executive Function, Female, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Humans, Inhibition (Psychology), Intelligence, Male, Memory, Short-Term, Neuropsychological Tests, Phenotype, Risk Factors",
author = "R Kothari and F Solmi and J Treasure and N Micali",
year = "2013",
month = "7",
doi = "10.1017/S0033291712002188",
language = "English",
volume = "43",
pages = "1543--1554",
journal = "Psychological Medicine",
issn = "0033-2917",
number = "7",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - The neuropsychological profile of children at high risk of developing an eating disorder

AU - Kothari, R

AU - Solmi, F

AU - Treasure, J

AU - Micali, N

PY - 2013/7

Y1 - 2013/7

N2 - Background: There is a large body of evidence indicating that eating disorders (EDs) are characterized by particular neuropsychological profiles. We aimed to further explore whether impairments in neuropsychological functioning previously found in ED groups are present prior to onset, or are secondary to the disorder.Method: This is the first study to explore neuropsychological functioning in children born to a mother with a lifetime ED, who are therefore at high risk of developing an ED, in a large cohort sample. We investigated intelligence and attention at age 8 years (n = 6201) and working memory (WM) and inhibition at age 10 years (6192) in children who are at high risk of developing an ED, compared to children who are not.Results: The children of women with lifetime anorexia nervosa (AN) showed high full-scale and performance IQ, increased WM capacity, better visuo-spatial functioning, and decreased attentional control. The children of women with lifetime bulimia nervosa (BN) showed comparatively poor visuo-spatial functioning.Conclusions: Our findings suggest that high intelligence, increased WM capacity and impaired attentional control might be intermediate phenotypes on the pathway between genetic vulnerability and the development of an ED.

AB - Background: There is a large body of evidence indicating that eating disorders (EDs) are characterized by particular neuropsychological profiles. We aimed to further explore whether impairments in neuropsychological functioning previously found in ED groups are present prior to onset, or are secondary to the disorder.Method: This is the first study to explore neuropsychological functioning in children born to a mother with a lifetime ED, who are therefore at high risk of developing an ED, in a large cohort sample. We investigated intelligence and attention at age 8 years (n = 6201) and working memory (WM) and inhibition at age 10 years (6192) in children who are at high risk of developing an ED, compared to children who are not.Results: The children of women with lifetime anorexia nervosa (AN) showed high full-scale and performance IQ, increased WM capacity, better visuo-spatial functioning, and decreased attentional control. The children of women with lifetime bulimia nervosa (BN) showed comparatively poor visuo-spatial functioning.Conclusions: Our findings suggest that high intelligence, increased WM capacity and impaired attentional control might be intermediate phenotypes on the pathway between genetic vulnerability and the development of an ED.

KW - Anorexia Nervosa

KW - Attention

KW - Bulimia Nervosa

KW - Child

KW - Child of Impaired Parents

KW - Cohort Studies

KW - Executive Function

KW - Female

KW - Genetic Predisposition to Disease

KW - Humans

KW - Inhibition (Psychology)

KW - Intelligence

KW - Male

KW - Memory, Short-Term

KW - Neuropsychological Tests

KW - Phenotype

KW - Risk Factors

U2 - 10.1017/S0033291712002188

DO - 10.1017/S0033291712002188

M3 - Article

C2 - 23021014

VL - 43

SP - 1543

EP - 1554

JO - Psychological Medicine

JF - Psychological Medicine

SN - 0033-2917

IS - 7

ER -

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