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The play's the thing: Development of an interprofessional drama

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)107-120
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Integrated Care
Volume24
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 18 Apr 2016

King's Authors

Abstract

Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to report and discuss the findings of an evaluation of the drama performance and reception of Let's Talk in the context of interprofessional practice. Design/methodology/approach - This first stage evaluation addresses the initial development stage of the Let's Talk drama initiative from the perspectives of health and social care participants. Recent policy and research are drawn upon in the presentation of the background to the drama and service integration imperatives. Findings - Most research on the subject of interprofessional education comes from professional training programmes. The development of the drama Let's Talk provides evidence of how such a narrative can engage with local professionals working in different agencies but with the same patient or user groups. The development of such an initiative takes time and testing of it at early stages appears to be valuable in providing it with greater clarity and authenticity. Research limitations/implications - The paper addresses the developmental stages of an interprofessional drama initiative in one part of England in a locality where there is relative professional stability and reasonable communication across agencies and local support for workforce development. Practical implications - The evaluation may prompt reflection in practice and policy development on the potential for participation in role play and drama to be useful in changing cultures and in increasing interprofessional understanding. Originality/value - The paper contributes to understanding of the need for interprofessional and interagency debates to be informed by cultural change and active engagement with busy professionals. It recommends attention to careful development of such initiatives and to debate about what might be meaningful and long-term impacts.

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