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The presence, characteristics and correlates of pathological social withdrawal in Taiwan: An online survey

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The presence, characteristics and correlates of pathological social withdrawal in Taiwan : An online survey. / Wu, Alison Fang-Wei; Catmur, Caroline; Wong, Paul Wc; Lau, Jennifer Yf.

In: The International journal of social psychiatry, Vol. 66, No. 1, 01.02.2020, p. 84-92.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Wu, AF-W, Catmur, C, Wong, PW & Lau, JY 2020, 'The presence, characteristics and correlates of pathological social withdrawal in Taiwan: An online survey', The International journal of social psychiatry, vol. 66, no. 1, pp. 84-92. https://doi.org/10.1177/0020764019882724

APA

Wu, A. F-W., Catmur, C., Wong, P. W., & Lau, J. Y. (2020). The presence, characteristics and correlates of pathological social withdrawal in Taiwan: An online survey. The International journal of social psychiatry, 66(1), 84-92. https://doi.org/10.1177/0020764019882724

Vancouver

Wu AF-W, Catmur C, Wong PW, Lau JY. The presence, characteristics and correlates of pathological social withdrawal in Taiwan: An online survey. The International journal of social psychiatry. 2020 Feb 1;66(1):84-92. https://doi.org/10.1177/0020764019882724

Author

Wu, Alison Fang-Wei ; Catmur, Caroline ; Wong, Paul Wc ; Lau, Jennifer Yf. / The presence, characteristics and correlates of pathological social withdrawal in Taiwan : An online survey. In: The International journal of social psychiatry. 2020 ; Vol. 66, No. 1. pp. 84-92.

Bibtex Download

@article{fdb41790d03e48af95a6a214850ce84a,
title = "The presence, characteristics and correlates of pathological social withdrawal in Taiwan: An online survey",
abstract = "OBJECTIVES: Pathological social withdrawal (PSW) has become a public health concern, especially in Asia. However, few studies have investigated the presence of PSW and its characteristics in Taiwan. In this study, we aimed to discover whether individuals in Taiwan display PSW behaviours, the demographic characteristics and psychiatric history of those meeting criteria for PSW and the associated psychological risks.METHODS: An online self-report survey collected participants' demographic characteristics, social behaviours and their psychiatric history, along with information on adherence to cultural norms and mental health.RESULTS: Among 1,046 valid respondents, 9{\%} reported behaviours consistent with PSW for at least 6 months, commensurate with other online surveys in Asian countries. Around 20{\%} of these also reported current or past psychiatric disorders, although this was lower than previous findings (50{\%}-80{\%}). Participants with PSW reported poorer mental health and lower confidence in social/academic/work skills than unaffected participants.CONCLUSION: This study identified for the first time the presence of PSW in Taiwan. Except the lower rates of psychiatric comorbidity (which could be explained by sociocultural factors and sampling methods), data were consistent with previous findings. We also extended our understanding of possible psychological risk factors associated with this pathological condition.",
keywords = "Hikikomori, Severe social withdrawal, correlate factors, psychopathology, social epidemiology",
author = "Wu, {Alison Fang-Wei} and Caroline Catmur and Wong, {Paul Wc} and Lau, {Jennifer Yf}",
year = "2020",
month = "2",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/0020764019882724",
language = "English",
volume = "66",
pages = "84--92",
journal = "The International journal of social psychiatry",
issn = "0020-7640",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Ltd",
number = "1",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - The presence, characteristics and correlates of pathological social withdrawal in Taiwan

T2 - An online survey

AU - Wu, Alison Fang-Wei

AU - Catmur, Caroline

AU - Wong, Paul Wc

AU - Lau, Jennifer Yf

PY - 2020/2/1

Y1 - 2020/2/1

N2 - OBJECTIVES: Pathological social withdrawal (PSW) has become a public health concern, especially in Asia. However, few studies have investigated the presence of PSW and its characteristics in Taiwan. In this study, we aimed to discover whether individuals in Taiwan display PSW behaviours, the demographic characteristics and psychiatric history of those meeting criteria for PSW and the associated psychological risks.METHODS: An online self-report survey collected participants' demographic characteristics, social behaviours and their psychiatric history, along with information on adherence to cultural norms and mental health.RESULTS: Among 1,046 valid respondents, 9% reported behaviours consistent with PSW for at least 6 months, commensurate with other online surveys in Asian countries. Around 20% of these also reported current or past psychiatric disorders, although this was lower than previous findings (50%-80%). Participants with PSW reported poorer mental health and lower confidence in social/academic/work skills than unaffected participants.CONCLUSION: This study identified for the first time the presence of PSW in Taiwan. Except the lower rates of psychiatric comorbidity (which could be explained by sociocultural factors and sampling methods), data were consistent with previous findings. We also extended our understanding of possible psychological risk factors associated with this pathological condition.

AB - OBJECTIVES: Pathological social withdrawal (PSW) has become a public health concern, especially in Asia. However, few studies have investigated the presence of PSW and its characteristics in Taiwan. In this study, we aimed to discover whether individuals in Taiwan display PSW behaviours, the demographic characteristics and psychiatric history of those meeting criteria for PSW and the associated psychological risks.METHODS: An online self-report survey collected participants' demographic characteristics, social behaviours and their psychiatric history, along with information on adherence to cultural norms and mental health.RESULTS: Among 1,046 valid respondents, 9% reported behaviours consistent with PSW for at least 6 months, commensurate with other online surveys in Asian countries. Around 20% of these also reported current or past psychiatric disorders, although this was lower than previous findings (50%-80%). Participants with PSW reported poorer mental health and lower confidence in social/academic/work skills than unaffected participants.CONCLUSION: This study identified for the first time the presence of PSW in Taiwan. Except the lower rates of psychiatric comorbidity (which could be explained by sociocultural factors and sampling methods), data were consistent with previous findings. We also extended our understanding of possible psychological risk factors associated with this pathological condition.

KW - Hikikomori

KW - Severe social withdrawal

KW - correlate factors

KW - psychopathology

KW - social epidemiology

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85074474214&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/0020764019882724

DO - 10.1177/0020764019882724

M3 - Article

C2 - 31647367

VL - 66

SP - 84

EP - 92

JO - The International journal of social psychiatry

JF - The International journal of social psychiatry

SN - 0020-7640

IS - 1

ER -

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