The relationship between genetic liability, childhood maltreatment, and IQ: findings from the EU-GEI multicentric case-control study

EU-GEI WP2 Group, Celso Arango, Manuel Arrojo, Miguel Bernardo, Julio Bobes, Julio Sanjuán, Jose Luis Santos, Paulo Rossi Menezes, Cristina Marta Del-Ben, Hannah E. Jongsma, Peter B. Jones, J Kirkbride, Pierre-Michel Llorca, Andrea Tortelli, Baptiste Pignon, Liewe de Haan, Jean-Paul Selten, Jim van Os, Bart Rutten, Richard BentallMarta Di Forti, Robin Murray, Craig Morgan, Helen Fisher

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Abstract

This study investigated if the association between childhood maltreatment and cognition among psychosis patients and community controls was partially accounted for by genetic liability for psychosis. Patients with first-episode psychosis (N = 755) and unaffected controls (N = 1219) from the EU-GEI study were assessed for childhood maltreatment, intelligence quotient (IQ), family history of psychosis (FH), and polygenic risk score for schizophrenia (SZ-PRS). Controlling for FH and SZ-PRS did not attenuate the association between childhood maltreatment and IQ in cases or controls. Findings suggest that these expressions of genetic liability cannot account for the lower levels of cognition found among adults maltreated in childhood.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1573-1580
Number of pages8
JournalSocial Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology
Volume58
Issue number10
Early online date19 Jun 2023
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2023

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