The right ventricular involvement in dilated cardiomyopathy: prevalence and prognostic implications of the often-neglected child

Paolo Manca, Vincenzo Nuzzi, Antonio Cannatà, Matteo Castrichini, Daniel I. Bromage, Antonio De Luca, Davide Stolfo, Uwe Schulz, Marco Merlo*, Gianfranco Sinagra

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

9 Citations (Scopus)
55 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a primary heart muscle disease characterized by left or biventricular systolic impairment. Historically, most of the clinical attention has been devoted to the evaluation of left ventricular function and morphology, while right ventricle (RV) has been for many years the forgotten chamber. Recently, progresses in cardiac imaging gave clinicians precious tools for the evaluation of RV, raising the awareness of the importance of biventricular assessment in DCM. Indeed, RV involvement is far from being uncommon in DCM, and the presence of right ventricular dysfunction (RVD) is one of the major negative prognostic determinants in DCM patients. However, some aspects such as the possible role of specific genetic mutations in determining the biventricular phenotype in DCM, or the lack of specific treatments able to primarily counteract RVD, still need research. In this review, we summarized the current knowledge on RV involvement in DCM, giving an overview on the epidemiology and pathogenetic mechanisms implicated in determining RVD. Furthermore, we discussed the imaging techniques to evaluate RV function and the role of RV failure in advanced heart failure.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1795-1805
Number of pages11
JournalHeart Failure Reviews
Volume27
Issue number5
Early online date22 Mar 2022
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sept 2022

Keywords

  • Advanced heart failure
  • Cardiac imaging
  • Dilated cardiomyopathy
  • Prognosis
  • Right ventricle

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The right ventricular involvement in dilated cardiomyopathy: prevalence and prognostic implications of the often-neglected child'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this