The role of evidence-based guidelines in the diagnosis and treatment of functional neurological disorder

Benjamin Tolchin, Gaston Baslet, Alan Carson, Barbara Dworetzky, Laura Goldstein, W. Curt LaFrance Jnr, Steve Martino, David Perez, Markus Reuber, Jon Stone, Jerzy Szaflarski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)
4 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines, based on systematic reviews of existing evidence, play an important role in improving and standardizing the quality of patient care in many medical and psychiatric disorders, and could play an important role in the diagnosis and treatment of functional seizures and other functional neurological disorder (FND) subtypes. There are several reasons to think that evidence-based guidelines might be especially beneficial for the management of FND. In particular, the interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary teamwork necessary for the care of people with FND, the current lack of formal clinical training in FND, and the rapidly expanding body of evidence relating to FND all make guidelines based on systematic literature reviews especially valuable. In this perspective piece, we review clinical practice guidelines, their advantages and limitations, the reasons why evidence-based guidelines might be especially beneficial in the diagnosis and treatment of FND, and the steps that must be taken to create such guidelines for FND. We propose that professional organizations such as the American Academy of Neurology and the American Psychiatric Association undertake guideline development, ideally to create a co-authored or jointly endorsed set of guidelines that can set standards for interdisciplinary care for neurologists and mental health clinicians alike.
Original languageEnglish
Article number100494
JournalEpilepsy & Behavior Reports
Volume16
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 23 Nov 2021

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The role of evidence-based guidelines in the diagnosis and treatment of functional neurological disorder'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this