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The TMJ disc is a common ancestral feature in all mammals, as evidenced by the presence of a rudimentary disc during monotreme development

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The TMJ disc is a common ancestral feature in all mammals, as evidenced by the presence of a rudimentary disc during monotreme development. / Anthwal, Neal; Tucker, Abigail Saffron.

In: Frontiers in Cell and Developmental Biology, Vol. 8, 356, 19.05.2020.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Anthwal, N & Tucker, AS 2020, 'The TMJ disc is a common ancestral feature in all mammals, as evidenced by the presence of a rudimentary disc during monotreme development', Frontiers in Cell and Developmental Biology, vol. 8, 356. https://doi.org/10.3389/fcell.2020.00356

APA

Anthwal, N., & Tucker, A. S. (2020). The TMJ disc is a common ancestral feature in all mammals, as evidenced by the presence of a rudimentary disc during monotreme development. Frontiers in Cell and Developmental Biology, 8, [356]. https://doi.org/10.3389/fcell.2020.00356

Vancouver

Anthwal N, Tucker AS. The TMJ disc is a common ancestral feature in all mammals, as evidenced by the presence of a rudimentary disc during monotreme development. Frontiers in Cell and Developmental Biology. 2020 May 19;8. 356. https://doi.org/10.3389/fcell.2020.00356

Author

Anthwal, Neal ; Tucker, Abigail Saffron. / The TMJ disc is a common ancestral feature in all mammals, as evidenced by the presence of a rudimentary disc during monotreme development. In: Frontiers in Cell and Developmental Biology. 2020 ; Vol. 8.

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@article{dc79a9e12c85448393a1e16f2f2f27b2,
title = "The TMJ disc is a common ancestral feature in all mammals, as evidenced by the presence of a rudimentary disc during monotreme development",
abstract = "The novel mammalian jaw joint, known in humans as the temporomandibular joint or TMJ, is cushioned by a fibrocartilage disc. This disc is secondarily absent in therian mammals that have lost their dentition, such as giant anteaters and some baleen whales. The disc is also absent in all monotremes. However, it is not known if the absence in monotremes is secondary to the loss of dentition, or if it is an ancestral absence. We use museum held platypus and echidna histological sections to demonstrate that the developing monotreme jaw joint forms a disc primordium that fails to mature and become separated from the mandibular condyle. We then show that monotreme developmental anatomy is similar to that observed in transgenic mouse mutants with reduced cranial musculature. We therefore suggest that the absence of the disc on monotremes is a consequence of the changes in jaw musculature associated with the loss of adult teeth. Taken together, these data indicate that the ancestors of extant monotremes likely had a jaw joint disc, and that the disc evolved in the last common ancestor of all mammals.",
keywords = "TMJ disc, evo devo, jaw joint, mammalian evolution, monotreme, muscle, tendon",
author = "Neal Anthwal and Tucker, {Abigail Saffron}",
year = "2020",
month = "5",
day = "19",
doi = "10.3389/fcell.2020.00356",
language = "English",
volume = "8",
journal = "Frontiers in Cell and Developmental Biology",
issn = "2296-634X",
publisher = "Frontiers Media S.A.",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - The TMJ disc is a common ancestral feature in all mammals, as evidenced by the presence of a rudimentary disc during monotreme development

AU - Anthwal, Neal

AU - Tucker, Abigail Saffron

PY - 2020/5/19

Y1 - 2020/5/19

N2 - The novel mammalian jaw joint, known in humans as the temporomandibular joint or TMJ, is cushioned by a fibrocartilage disc. This disc is secondarily absent in therian mammals that have lost their dentition, such as giant anteaters and some baleen whales. The disc is also absent in all monotremes. However, it is not known if the absence in monotremes is secondary to the loss of dentition, or if it is an ancestral absence. We use museum held platypus and echidna histological sections to demonstrate that the developing monotreme jaw joint forms a disc primordium that fails to mature and become separated from the mandibular condyle. We then show that monotreme developmental anatomy is similar to that observed in transgenic mouse mutants with reduced cranial musculature. We therefore suggest that the absence of the disc on monotremes is a consequence of the changes in jaw musculature associated with the loss of adult teeth. Taken together, these data indicate that the ancestors of extant monotremes likely had a jaw joint disc, and that the disc evolved in the last common ancestor of all mammals.

AB - The novel mammalian jaw joint, known in humans as the temporomandibular joint or TMJ, is cushioned by a fibrocartilage disc. This disc is secondarily absent in therian mammals that have lost their dentition, such as giant anteaters and some baleen whales. The disc is also absent in all monotremes. However, it is not known if the absence in monotremes is secondary to the loss of dentition, or if it is an ancestral absence. We use museum held platypus and echidna histological sections to demonstrate that the developing monotreme jaw joint forms a disc primordium that fails to mature and become separated from the mandibular condyle. We then show that monotreme developmental anatomy is similar to that observed in transgenic mouse mutants with reduced cranial musculature. We therefore suggest that the absence of the disc on monotremes is a consequence of the changes in jaw musculature associated with the loss of adult teeth. Taken together, these data indicate that the ancestors of extant monotremes likely had a jaw joint disc, and that the disc evolved in the last common ancestor of all mammals.

KW - TMJ disc

KW - evo devo

KW - jaw joint

KW - mammalian evolution

KW - monotreme

KW - muscle

KW - tendon

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85085858170&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3389/fcell.2020.00356

DO - 10.3389/fcell.2020.00356

M3 - Article

VL - 8

JO - Frontiers in Cell and Developmental Biology

JF - Frontiers in Cell and Developmental Biology

SN - 2296-634X

M1 - 356

ER -

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