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Threat-sensitivity in affective disorders: A case-control study

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Threat-sensitivity in affective disorders : A case-control study. / Perkins, Adam M; Bley, Julia Große; Cleare, Anthony J; Young, Allan H; Corr, Philip J; Dohrenbusch, Ralf; Ettinger, Ulrich.

In: Journal of Affective Disorders, Vol. 266, 01.04.2020, p. 595-602.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Perkins, AM, Bley, JG, Cleare, AJ, Young, AH, Corr, PJ, Dohrenbusch, R & Ettinger, U 2020, 'Threat-sensitivity in affective disorders: A case-control study', Journal of Affective Disorders, vol. 266, pp. 595-602. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2020.01.074

APA

Perkins, A. M., Bley, J. G., Cleare, A. J., Young, A. H., Corr, P. J., Dohrenbusch, R., & Ettinger, U. (2020). Threat-sensitivity in affective disorders: A case-control study. Journal of Affective Disorders, 266, 595-602. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2020.01.074

Vancouver

Perkins AM, Bley JG, Cleare AJ, Young AH, Corr PJ, Dohrenbusch R et al. Threat-sensitivity in affective disorders: A case-control study. Journal of Affective Disorders. 2020 Apr 1;266:595-602. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2020.01.074

Author

Perkins, Adam M ; Bley, Julia Große ; Cleare, Anthony J ; Young, Allan H ; Corr, Philip J ; Dohrenbusch, Ralf ; Ettinger, Ulrich. / Threat-sensitivity in affective disorders : A case-control study. In: Journal of Affective Disorders. 2020 ; Vol. 266. pp. 595-602.

Bibtex Download

@article{a69787ac67af438895b6f5cb0ee14c11,
title = "Threat-sensitivity in affective disorders: A case-control study",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Anxiety disorders are highly comorbid with major depression but differ in their symptom profiles and pharmacological responses. Threat-sensitivity may explain such differences, yet research on its relationship to specific disorders is lacking.METHODS: One-hundred patients (71 women) and 35 healthy controls (23 women) were recruited. Thirty-five had Panic Disorder (PD), 32 had Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) and 33 Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). Threat-sensitivity was measured via behaviour (Joystick Operated Runway Task; JORT) and self-report (Fear Survey Schedule; FSS).RESULTS: Behavioural sensitivity to simple threat was higher in females compared to males (p = .03). Self-reported sensitivity to simple threat (FSS Tissue Damage Fear) was higher in PD patients compared to other groups (p ≤ .007) and in GAD patients compared to controls (p = .02). Behavioural sensitivity to complex threat was higher in females than males (p = .03) and a group by sex interaction (p = .01) indicated that this difference was largest in PD patients. Self-reported sensitivity to complex threat (FSS Social Fear) was higher in all patients compared to controls (p ≤ .001). Females scored higher than males on FSS Tissue Damage Fear and FSS Social Fear).CONCLUSIONS: Our findings oppose the simple/complex threat dichotomy, instead suggesting elevated sensitivity to physical threat differentiates anxiety disorders from MDD, whereas elevated sensitivity to social threat is associated with both anxiety disorders and MDD.",
keywords = "Affective disorders, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Joystick Operated Runway Task, Panic disorder, Personality",
author = "Perkins, {Adam M} and Bley, {Julia Gro{\ss}e} and Cleare, {Anthony J} and Young, {Allan H} and Corr, {Philip J} and Ralf Dohrenbusch and Ulrich Ettinger",
note = "Copyright {\circledC} 2020 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.",
year = "2020",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jad.2020.01.074",
language = "English",
volume = "266",
pages = "595--602",
journal = "Journal of affective disorders",
issn = "0165-0327",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Threat-sensitivity in affective disorders

T2 - A case-control study

AU - Perkins, Adam M

AU - Bley, Julia Große

AU - Cleare, Anthony J

AU - Young, Allan H

AU - Corr, Philip J

AU - Dohrenbusch, Ralf

AU - Ettinger, Ulrich

N1 - Copyright © 2020 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

PY - 2020/4/1

Y1 - 2020/4/1

N2 - BACKGROUND: Anxiety disorders are highly comorbid with major depression but differ in their symptom profiles and pharmacological responses. Threat-sensitivity may explain such differences, yet research on its relationship to specific disorders is lacking.METHODS: One-hundred patients (71 women) and 35 healthy controls (23 women) were recruited. Thirty-five had Panic Disorder (PD), 32 had Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) and 33 Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). Threat-sensitivity was measured via behaviour (Joystick Operated Runway Task; JORT) and self-report (Fear Survey Schedule; FSS).RESULTS: Behavioural sensitivity to simple threat was higher in females compared to males (p = .03). Self-reported sensitivity to simple threat (FSS Tissue Damage Fear) was higher in PD patients compared to other groups (p ≤ .007) and in GAD patients compared to controls (p = .02). Behavioural sensitivity to complex threat was higher in females than males (p = .03) and a group by sex interaction (p = .01) indicated that this difference was largest in PD patients. Self-reported sensitivity to complex threat (FSS Social Fear) was higher in all patients compared to controls (p ≤ .001). Females scored higher than males on FSS Tissue Damage Fear and FSS Social Fear).CONCLUSIONS: Our findings oppose the simple/complex threat dichotomy, instead suggesting elevated sensitivity to physical threat differentiates anxiety disorders from MDD, whereas elevated sensitivity to social threat is associated with both anxiety disorders and MDD.

AB - BACKGROUND: Anxiety disorders are highly comorbid with major depression but differ in their symptom profiles and pharmacological responses. Threat-sensitivity may explain such differences, yet research on its relationship to specific disorders is lacking.METHODS: One-hundred patients (71 women) and 35 healthy controls (23 women) were recruited. Thirty-five had Panic Disorder (PD), 32 had Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) and 33 Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). Threat-sensitivity was measured via behaviour (Joystick Operated Runway Task; JORT) and self-report (Fear Survey Schedule; FSS).RESULTS: Behavioural sensitivity to simple threat was higher in females compared to males (p = .03). Self-reported sensitivity to simple threat (FSS Tissue Damage Fear) was higher in PD patients compared to other groups (p ≤ .007) and in GAD patients compared to controls (p = .02). Behavioural sensitivity to complex threat was higher in females than males (p = .03) and a group by sex interaction (p = .01) indicated that this difference was largest in PD patients. Self-reported sensitivity to complex threat (FSS Social Fear) was higher in all patients compared to controls (p ≤ .001). Females scored higher than males on FSS Tissue Damage Fear and FSS Social Fear).CONCLUSIONS: Our findings oppose the simple/complex threat dichotomy, instead suggesting elevated sensitivity to physical threat differentiates anxiety disorders from MDD, whereas elevated sensitivity to social threat is associated with both anxiety disorders and MDD.

KW - Affective disorders

KW - Generalized Anxiety Disorder

KW - Joystick Operated Runway Task

KW - Panic disorder

KW - Personality

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85079006642&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jad.2020.01.074

DO - 10.1016/j.jad.2020.01.074

M3 - Article

C2 - 32056932

VL - 266

SP - 595

EP - 602

JO - Journal of affective disorders

JF - Journal of affective disorders

SN - 0165-0327

ER -

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