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Tissue-resident macrophages in omentum promote metastatic spread of ovarian cancer

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Tissue-resident macrophages in omentum promote metastatic spread of ovarian cancer. / Etzerodt, Anders; Moulin, Morgane; Doktor, Thomas Koed; Delfini, Marcello; Mossadegh-Keller, Noushine; Bajenoff, Marc; Sieweke, Michael H.; Moestrup, Søren Kragh; Auphan-Anezin, Nathalie; Lawrence, Toby.

In: The Journal of experimental medicine, Vol. 217, No. 4, e20191869, 06.04.2020.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Etzerodt, A, Moulin, M, Doktor, TK, Delfini, M, Mossadegh-Keller, N, Bajenoff, M, Sieweke, MH, Moestrup, SK, Auphan-Anezin, N & Lawrence, T 2020, 'Tissue-resident macrophages in omentum promote metastatic spread of ovarian cancer', The Journal of experimental medicine, vol. 217, no. 4, e20191869. https://doi.org/10.1084/jem.20191869

APA

Etzerodt, A., Moulin, M., Doktor, T. K., Delfini, M., Mossadegh-Keller, N., Bajenoff, M., ... Lawrence, T. (2020). Tissue-resident macrophages in omentum promote metastatic spread of ovarian cancer. The Journal of experimental medicine, 217(4), [e20191869]. https://doi.org/10.1084/jem.20191869

Vancouver

Etzerodt A, Moulin M, Doktor TK, Delfini M, Mossadegh-Keller N, Bajenoff M et al. Tissue-resident macrophages in omentum promote metastatic spread of ovarian cancer. The Journal of experimental medicine. 2020 Apr 6;217(4). e20191869. https://doi.org/10.1084/jem.20191869

Author

Etzerodt, Anders ; Moulin, Morgane ; Doktor, Thomas Koed ; Delfini, Marcello ; Mossadegh-Keller, Noushine ; Bajenoff, Marc ; Sieweke, Michael H. ; Moestrup, Søren Kragh ; Auphan-Anezin, Nathalie ; Lawrence, Toby. / Tissue-resident macrophages in omentum promote metastatic spread of ovarian cancer. In: The Journal of experimental medicine. 2020 ; Vol. 217, No. 4.

Bibtex Download

@article{5b3ba6b4371249baa5d4471b3479873e,
title = "Tissue-resident macrophages in omentum promote metastatic spread of ovarian cancer",
abstract = "Experimental and clinical evidence suggests that tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) play important roles in cancer progression. Here, we have characterized the ontogeny and function of TAM subsets in a mouse model of metastatic ovarian cancer that is representative for visceral peritoneal metastasis. We show that the omentum is a critical premetastatic niche for development of invasive disease in this model and define a unique subset of CD163+ Tim4+ resident omental macrophages responsible for metastatic spread of ovarian cancer cells. Transcriptomic analysis showed that resident CD163+ Tim4+ omental macrophages were phenotypically distinct and maintained their resident identity during tumor growth. Selective depletion of CD163+ Tim4+ macrophages in omentum using genetic and pharmacological tools prevented tumor progression and metastatic spread of disease. These studies describe a specific role for tissue-resident macrophages in the invasive progression of metastatic ovarian cancer. The molecular pathways of cross-talk between tissue-resident macrophages and disseminated cancer cells may represent new targets to prevent metastasis and disease recurrence.",
author = "Anders Etzerodt and Morgane Moulin and Doktor, {Thomas Koed} and Marcello Delfini and Noushine Mossadegh-Keller and Marc Bajenoff and Sieweke, {Michael H.} and Moestrup, {S{\o}ren Kragh} and Nathalie Auphan-Anezin and Toby Lawrence",
year = "2020",
month = "4",
day = "6",
doi = "10.1084/jem.20191869",
language = "English",
volume = "217",
journal = "The Journal of experimental medicine",
issn = "0022-1007",
number = "4",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Tissue-resident macrophages in omentum promote metastatic spread of ovarian cancer

AU - Etzerodt, Anders

AU - Moulin, Morgane

AU - Doktor, Thomas Koed

AU - Delfini, Marcello

AU - Mossadegh-Keller, Noushine

AU - Bajenoff, Marc

AU - Sieweke, Michael H.

AU - Moestrup, Søren Kragh

AU - Auphan-Anezin, Nathalie

AU - Lawrence, Toby

PY - 2020/4/6

Y1 - 2020/4/6

N2 - Experimental and clinical evidence suggests that tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) play important roles in cancer progression. Here, we have characterized the ontogeny and function of TAM subsets in a mouse model of metastatic ovarian cancer that is representative for visceral peritoneal metastasis. We show that the omentum is a critical premetastatic niche for development of invasive disease in this model and define a unique subset of CD163+ Tim4+ resident omental macrophages responsible for metastatic spread of ovarian cancer cells. Transcriptomic analysis showed that resident CD163+ Tim4+ omental macrophages were phenotypically distinct and maintained their resident identity during tumor growth. Selective depletion of CD163+ Tim4+ macrophages in omentum using genetic and pharmacological tools prevented tumor progression and metastatic spread of disease. These studies describe a specific role for tissue-resident macrophages in the invasive progression of metastatic ovarian cancer. The molecular pathways of cross-talk between tissue-resident macrophages and disseminated cancer cells may represent new targets to prevent metastasis and disease recurrence.

AB - Experimental and clinical evidence suggests that tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) play important roles in cancer progression. Here, we have characterized the ontogeny and function of TAM subsets in a mouse model of metastatic ovarian cancer that is representative for visceral peritoneal metastasis. We show that the omentum is a critical premetastatic niche for development of invasive disease in this model and define a unique subset of CD163+ Tim4+ resident omental macrophages responsible for metastatic spread of ovarian cancer cells. Transcriptomic analysis showed that resident CD163+ Tim4+ omental macrophages were phenotypically distinct and maintained their resident identity during tumor growth. Selective depletion of CD163+ Tim4+ macrophages in omentum using genetic and pharmacological tools prevented tumor progression and metastatic spread of disease. These studies describe a specific role for tissue-resident macrophages in the invasive progression of metastatic ovarian cancer. The molecular pathways of cross-talk between tissue-resident macrophages and disseminated cancer cells may represent new targets to prevent metastasis and disease recurrence.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85077941778&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1084/jem.20191869

DO - 10.1084/jem.20191869

M3 - Article

C2 - 31951251

VL - 217

JO - The Journal of experimental medicine

JF - The Journal of experimental medicine

SN - 0022-1007

IS - 4

M1 - e20191869

ER -

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