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Tradeoffs of Inclusion: Development in Ancient Athens

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Tradeoffs of Inclusion: Development in Ancient Athens. / Carugati, Fedrica.

In: COMPARATIVE POLITICAL STUDIES, Vol. 53, No. 1, 2020, p. 144-170.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Carugati, F 2020, 'Tradeoffs of Inclusion: Development in Ancient Athens', COMPARATIVE POLITICAL STUDIES, vol. 53, no. 1, pp. 144-170. https://doi.org/10.1177/0010414019843557

APA

Carugati, F. (2020). Tradeoffs of Inclusion: Development in Ancient Athens. COMPARATIVE POLITICAL STUDIES, 53(1), 144-170. https://doi.org/10.1177/0010414019843557

Vancouver

Carugati F. Tradeoffs of Inclusion: Development in Ancient Athens. COMPARATIVE POLITICAL STUDIES. 2020;53(1):144-170. https://doi.org/10.1177/0010414019843557

Author

Carugati, Fedrica. / Tradeoffs of Inclusion: Development in Ancient Athens. In: COMPARATIVE POLITICAL STUDIES. 2020 ; Vol. 53, No. 1. pp. 144-170.

Bibtex Download

@article{1832217cf297483b87e3104900e8ffa2,
title = "Tradeoffs of Inclusion: Development in Ancient Athens",
abstract = "Inclusive institutions play an important role in development. But how do inclusive institutions emerge? Inclusion is always the product of a tradeoff. The existing literature focuses on the tradeoffs that yield an extension of the franchise, which requires costly power-sharing agreements. This article uses evidence from ancient Athens to show that meaningful forms of welfare-enhancing inclusion need not await the historically infrequent and high-stakes conditions that compel dominant elites to share power. In the 4th century BCE, the Athenians extended access to economic, social, and legal institutions to selected categories of non-citizens. They did not, however, extend the franchise. The Athenian tradeoff between political and other forms of inclusion was a response to the conflicting demands of social order and growth. While falling short of full political inclusion, the tradeoff was nonetheless conducive to political and economic development.",
keywords = "ancient Athens, development, inclusive institutions",
author = "Fedrica Carugati",
year = "2020",
doi = "https://doi.org/10.1177/0010414019843557",
language = "English",
volume = "53",
pages = "144--170",
journal = "COMPARATIVE POLITICAL STUDIES",
issn = "0010-4140",
publisher = "Sage",
number = "1",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Tradeoffs of Inclusion: Development in Ancient Athens

AU - Carugati, Fedrica

PY - 2020

Y1 - 2020

N2 - Inclusive institutions play an important role in development. But how do inclusive institutions emerge? Inclusion is always the product of a tradeoff. The existing literature focuses on the tradeoffs that yield an extension of the franchise, which requires costly power-sharing agreements. This article uses evidence from ancient Athens to show that meaningful forms of welfare-enhancing inclusion need not await the historically infrequent and high-stakes conditions that compel dominant elites to share power. In the 4th century BCE, the Athenians extended access to economic, social, and legal institutions to selected categories of non-citizens. They did not, however, extend the franchise. The Athenian tradeoff between political and other forms of inclusion was a response to the conflicting demands of social order and growth. While falling short of full political inclusion, the tradeoff was nonetheless conducive to political and economic development.

AB - Inclusive institutions play an important role in development. But how do inclusive institutions emerge? Inclusion is always the product of a tradeoff. The existing literature focuses on the tradeoffs that yield an extension of the franchise, which requires costly power-sharing agreements. This article uses evidence from ancient Athens to show that meaningful forms of welfare-enhancing inclusion need not await the historically infrequent and high-stakes conditions that compel dominant elites to share power. In the 4th century BCE, the Athenians extended access to economic, social, and legal institutions to selected categories of non-citizens. They did not, however, extend the franchise. The Athenian tradeoff between political and other forms of inclusion was a response to the conflicting demands of social order and growth. While falling short of full political inclusion, the tradeoff was nonetheless conducive to political and economic development.

KW - ancient Athens

KW - development

KW - inclusive institutions

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U2 - https://doi.org/10.1177/0010414019843557

DO - https://doi.org/10.1177/0010414019843557

M3 - Article

VL - 53

SP - 144

EP - 170

JO - COMPARATIVE POLITICAL STUDIES

JF - COMPARATIVE POLITICAL STUDIES

SN - 0010-4140

IS - 1

ER -

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