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Transparency in Europe: A Quantitative Study

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Transparency in Europe : A Quantitative Study. / Bouder, Frederic; Way, Dominic; Löfstedt, Ragnar; Evensen, Darrick.

In: Risk Analysis, Vol. 35, No. 7, 30.07.2015, p. 1210-1229.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Bouder, F, Way, D, Löfstedt, R & Evensen, D 2015, 'Transparency in Europe: A Quantitative Study', Risk Analysis, vol. 35, no. 7, pp. 1210-1229. https://doi.org/10.1111/risa.12386

APA

Bouder, F., Way, D., Löfstedt, R., & Evensen, D. (2015). Transparency in Europe: A Quantitative Study. Risk Analysis, 35(7), 1210-1229. https://doi.org/10.1111/risa.12386

Vancouver

Bouder F, Way D, Löfstedt R, Evensen D. Transparency in Europe: A Quantitative Study. Risk Analysis. 2015 Jul 30;35(7):1210-1229. https://doi.org/10.1111/risa.12386

Author

Bouder, Frederic ; Way, Dominic ; Löfstedt, Ragnar ; Evensen, Darrick. / Transparency in Europe : A Quantitative Study. In: Risk Analysis. 2015 ; Vol. 35, No. 7. pp. 1210-1229.

Bibtex Download

@article{ac50df9cea114e618ebd98f1b7fe5b63,
title = "Transparency in Europe: A Quantitative Study",
abstract = "In recent years, European pharmaceutical regulators have increasingly committed to heightening access to raw safety-related data as part of a wave of transparency initiatives (e.g., providing public Internet-mediated access to clinical trials data). Yet, the regulators-who are under significant pressure-have not yet benefited from a systematic review of this new policy. In seeking to inject much needed evidence, this article explores the effects of new transparency policies designed to promote meaningful communication of risks and benefits to patients. Results of a cross-national European survey with respondents from Great Britain, the Netherlands, Spain, France, Germany, and Sweden (N = 5,648) shed light on how patients and the public are likely to react to the regulators' new transparency policies. The findings demonstrate clear national variations in how European citizens are likely to react and emphasize the need to develop evidence-based, reasoned transparency policies that integrate benefit-risk communication. The authors conclude by providing six specific recommendations, informed by the study, that seek to improve the European transparency model both within the medical field and across health, safety, and environmental policy domains.",
keywords = "Cross-national, Decisionmaking, Europe, Pharmaceuticals, Risk communication, Transparency",
author = "Frederic Bouder and Dominic Way and Ragnar L{\"o}fstedt and Darrick Evensen",
year = "2015",
month = jul,
day = "30",
doi = "10.1111/risa.12386",
language = "English",
volume = "35",
pages = "1210--1229",
journal = "Risk Analysis",
issn = "0272-4332",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "7",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Transparency in Europe

T2 - A Quantitative Study

AU - Bouder, Frederic

AU - Way, Dominic

AU - Löfstedt, Ragnar

AU - Evensen, Darrick

PY - 2015/7/30

Y1 - 2015/7/30

N2 - In recent years, European pharmaceutical regulators have increasingly committed to heightening access to raw safety-related data as part of a wave of transparency initiatives (e.g., providing public Internet-mediated access to clinical trials data). Yet, the regulators-who are under significant pressure-have not yet benefited from a systematic review of this new policy. In seeking to inject much needed evidence, this article explores the effects of new transparency policies designed to promote meaningful communication of risks and benefits to patients. Results of a cross-national European survey with respondents from Great Britain, the Netherlands, Spain, France, Germany, and Sweden (N = 5,648) shed light on how patients and the public are likely to react to the regulators' new transparency policies. The findings demonstrate clear national variations in how European citizens are likely to react and emphasize the need to develop evidence-based, reasoned transparency policies that integrate benefit-risk communication. The authors conclude by providing six specific recommendations, informed by the study, that seek to improve the European transparency model both within the medical field and across health, safety, and environmental policy domains.

AB - In recent years, European pharmaceutical regulators have increasingly committed to heightening access to raw safety-related data as part of a wave of transparency initiatives (e.g., providing public Internet-mediated access to clinical trials data). Yet, the regulators-who are under significant pressure-have not yet benefited from a systematic review of this new policy. In seeking to inject much needed evidence, this article explores the effects of new transparency policies designed to promote meaningful communication of risks and benefits to patients. Results of a cross-national European survey with respondents from Great Britain, the Netherlands, Spain, France, Germany, and Sweden (N = 5,648) shed light on how patients and the public are likely to react to the regulators' new transparency policies. The findings demonstrate clear national variations in how European citizens are likely to react and emphasize the need to develop evidence-based, reasoned transparency policies that integrate benefit-risk communication. The authors conclude by providing six specific recommendations, informed by the study, that seek to improve the European transparency model both within the medical field and across health, safety, and environmental policy domains.

KW - Cross-national

KW - Decisionmaking

KW - Europe

KW - Pharmaceuticals

KW - Risk communication

KW - Transparency

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84938211557&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/risa.12386

DO - 10.1111/risa.12386

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84938211557

VL - 35

SP - 1210

EP - 1229

JO - Risk Analysis

JF - Risk Analysis

SN - 0272-4332

IS - 7

ER -

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