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Treatment of primary and secondary liver tumours with selective internal radiation therapy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

M Khodjibekova, T Szyszko, A Singh, P Tait, D Rubello, A Al-Nahhas

Original languageEnglish
Article numberN/A
Pages (from-to)561-570
Number of pages10
JournalJOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL AND CLINICAL CANCER RESEARCH
Volume26
Issue number4
PublishedDec 2007

King's Authors

Abstract

When HCC is diagnosed at an early stage or liver is affected by a solitary metastasis they can be curable by surgical resection, but this may not be feasible when an extensive tumoural involvement is present. In these cases, possible non-surgical therapies include systemic chemotherapy, chemical ablation (ethanol or acetic acid), radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, cryotherapy and transarterial chemoembolisation. All the above mentioned treatments have advantages and disadvantages. In the present paper we reported our experience with selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT) of non-operable HCC and metastatic liver using 99Yttrium (99Y) radioactive microspheres, and our data are compared and discussed with those reported in the literature. A MEDLINE-based review of the literature has been made in the period between 1990 and April 2007. Detailed information on patients selection criteria, SIRT procedure, dose calculation, safety and adverse reactions, follow-up schedule, and clinical efficacy are provided. On the basis of our data, in agreement with those of the literature, SIRT has added another effective method for treatment of primary and secondary liver tumours, being successful in a large number of patients in different experiences. Moreover, SIRT is well tolerated and has minimal adverse effects. Despite being regarded as non-curative, it has been associated with improved survival, reduction in tumour marker, and regression in the number and size of lesions. Follow-up with imaging is essential to assess the response to therapy, and in this respect FDG PET has been shown to be more sensitive than CT, particularly in the early stages.

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