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Uncomfortable Visions: The Rise and Decline of the Idea of Limited War

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

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Uncomfortable Visions : The Rise and Decline of the Idea of Limited War. / Honig, Jan Willem.

The Art of Creating Power: Freedman on Strategy. ed. / Benedict Wilkinson; James Gow. London : Hurst & Company, 2017. p. 29-47.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

Harvard

Honig, JW 2017, Uncomfortable Visions: The Rise and Decline of the Idea of Limited War. in B Wilkinson & J Gow (eds), The Art of Creating Power: Freedman on Strategy. Hurst & Company, London, pp. 29-47. https://doi.org/10.1093/oso/9780190851163.003.0003

APA

Honig, J. W. (2017). Uncomfortable Visions: The Rise and Decline of the Idea of Limited War. In B. Wilkinson, & J. Gow (Eds.), The Art of Creating Power: Freedman on Strategy (pp. 29-47). Hurst & Company. https://doi.org/10.1093/oso/9780190851163.003.0003

Vancouver

Honig JW. Uncomfortable Visions: The Rise and Decline of the Idea of Limited War. In Wilkinson B, Gow J, editors, The Art of Creating Power: Freedman on Strategy. London: Hurst & Company. 2017. p. 29-47 https://doi.org/10.1093/oso/9780190851163.003.0003

Author

Honig, Jan Willem. / Uncomfortable Visions : The Rise and Decline of the Idea of Limited War. The Art of Creating Power: Freedman on Strategy. editor / Benedict Wilkinson ; James Gow. London : Hurst & Company, 2017. pp. 29-47

Bibtex Download

@inbook{e90bed6374554409b83e3ec69bbe8667,
title = "Uncomfortable Visions: The Rise and Decline of the Idea of Limited War",
abstract = "This chapter interrogates strategy and warfare, in particular the themes of {\textquoteleft}limited war{\textquoteright} and influence. It argues that war is what we and our militaries make of it, paraphrasing Alexander Wendt{\textquoteright}s constructivist version of anarchy in international society. The notion of {\textquoteleft}comfortable{\textquoteright} and {\textquoteleft}uncomfortable{\textquoteright} wars is explored. {\textquoteleft}Comfortable{\textquoteright} refers to the way societies and militaries accept the idea of war that is very violent and for national survival, or some other {\textquoteleft}necessary{\textquoteright} reason. In contrast, the idea of limited war with limited means as a way of influencing enemies and opponents proves to be {\textquoteleft}uncomfortable{\textquoteright} because it does not fit the prevailing intellectual and cultural template – to say nothing of the practical issues that many limited wars have faced, from Vietnam to the twenty-first century. That reinforces the constructed character of warfare and the salience of interaction and interrelationships, bounded by the realities of physical and social force",
author = "Honig, {Jan Willem}",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.1093/oso/9780190851163.003.0003",
language = "English",
isbn = "9781849045810",
pages = "29--47",
editor = "Benedict Wilkinson and James Gow",
booktitle = "The Art of Creating Power",
publisher = "Hurst & Company",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) Download

TY - CHAP

T1 - Uncomfortable Visions

T2 - The Rise and Decline of the Idea of Limited War

AU - Honig, Jan Willem

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - This chapter interrogates strategy and warfare, in particular the themes of ‘limited war’ and influence. It argues that war is what we and our militaries make of it, paraphrasing Alexander Wendt’s constructivist version of anarchy in international society. The notion of ‘comfortable’ and ‘uncomfortable’ wars is explored. ‘Comfortable’ refers to the way societies and militaries accept the idea of war that is very violent and for national survival, or some other ‘necessary’ reason. In contrast, the idea of limited war with limited means as a way of influencing enemies and opponents proves to be ‘uncomfortable’ because it does not fit the prevailing intellectual and cultural template – to say nothing of the practical issues that many limited wars have faced, from Vietnam to the twenty-first century. That reinforces the constructed character of warfare and the salience of interaction and interrelationships, bounded by the realities of physical and social force

AB - This chapter interrogates strategy and warfare, in particular the themes of ‘limited war’ and influence. It argues that war is what we and our militaries make of it, paraphrasing Alexander Wendt’s constructivist version of anarchy in international society. The notion of ‘comfortable’ and ‘uncomfortable’ wars is explored. ‘Comfortable’ refers to the way societies and militaries accept the idea of war that is very violent and for national survival, or some other ‘necessary’ reason. In contrast, the idea of limited war with limited means as a way of influencing enemies and opponents proves to be ‘uncomfortable’ because it does not fit the prevailing intellectual and cultural template – to say nothing of the practical issues that many limited wars have faced, from Vietnam to the twenty-first century. That reinforces the constructed character of warfare and the salience of interaction and interrelationships, bounded by the realities of physical and social force

U2 - 10.1093/oso/9780190851163.003.0003

DO - 10.1093/oso/9780190851163.003.0003

M3 - Chapter

SN - 9781849045810

SP - 29

EP - 47

BT - The Art of Creating Power

A2 - Wilkinson, Benedict

A2 - Gow, James

PB - Hurst & Company

CY - London

ER -

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