King's College London

Research portal

Understanding Alzheimer's disease as a disorder of consciousness

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Jonathan D. Huntley, Stephen M. Fleming, Daniel C. Mograbi, Daniel Bor, Lorina Naci, Adrian M. Owen, Robert Howard

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere12203
JournalAlzheimer's and Dementia: Translational Research and Clinical Interventions
Volume7
Issue number1
DOIs
Published2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information: JH is funded by a Wellcome Clinical Research Career Development Fellowship (214547/Z/18/Z). SMF is funded by a Wellcome/Royal Society Sir Henry Dale Fellowship (206648/Z/17/Z) and a Philip Leverhulme Prize from the Leverhulme Trust. The Wellcome Centre for Human Neuroimaging is supported by core funding from the Wellcome Trust (206648/Z/17/Z). DB is funded by the Wellcome Trust (210920/Z/18/Z). AMO is a Fellow in the CIFAR Brain, Mind, and Consciousness programme. RH is supported by the NIHR UCLH BRC. Funding Information: JH is funded by a Wellcome Clinical Research Career Development Fellowship (214547/Z/18/Z). SMF is funded by a Wellcome/Royal Society Sir Henry Dale Fellowship (206648/Z/17/Z) and a Philip Leverhulme Prize from the Leverhulme Trust. The Wellcome Centre for Human Neuroimaging is supported by core funding from the Wellcome Trust (206648/Z/17/Z). DB is funded by the Wellcome Trust (210920/Z/18/Z). AMO is a Fellow in the CIFAR Brain, Mind, and Consciousness programme. RH is supported by the NIHR UCLH BRC. Publisher Copyright: © 2021 The Authors. Alzheimer's & Dementia: Translational Research & Clinical Interventions published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Alzheimer's Association.

King's Authors

Abstract

People with Alzheimer's disease (AD) demonstrate a range of alterations in consciousness. Changes in awareness of cognitive deficit, self-awareness, and introspection are seen early in AD, and dysfunction of awareness and arousal progresses with increasing disease severity. However, heterogeneity of deficits between individuals and a lack of empirical studies in people with severe dementia highlight the importance of identifying and applying biomarkers of awareness in AD. Impairments of awareness in AD are associated with neuropathology in regions that overlap with proposed neural correlates of consciousness. Recent developments in consciousness science provide theoretical frameworks and experimental approaches to help further understand the conscious experience of people with AD. Recognition of AD as a disorder of consciousness is overdue, and important to both understand the lived experience of people with AD and to improve care.

View graph of relations

© 2020 King's College London | Strand | London WC2R 2LS | England | United Kingdom | Tel +44 (0)20 7836 5454