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Viruses, parkinsonism and Parkinson’s disease: the past, present and future

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Valentina Leta, Daniele Urso, Lucia Batzu, Yue Hui Lau, Donna Mathew, Iro Boura, Vanessa Raeder, Cristian Falup-Pecurariu, Daniel van Wamelen, K. Ray Chaudhuri

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1119–1132
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Neural Transmission
Volume129
Issue number9
Early online date29 Aug 2022
DOIs
Accepted/In press1 Aug 2022
E-pub ahead of print29 Aug 2022
PublishedSep 2022

Bibliographical note

Funding Information: The views expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the NHS, NIHR or Department of Health. The authors acknowledge the support of the International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society Non-Motor PD Study Group, the NIHR London South Clinical Research Network and the NIHR Biomedical Research Centre. This article represents independent collaborative research part funded by the NIHR Biomedical Research Centre at South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust and King’s College London. Funding Information: The views expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the NHS, NIHR or Department of Health. The authors acknowledge the support of the International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society Non-Motor PD Study Group, the NIHR London South Clinical Research Network and the NIHR Biomedical Research Centre. This article represents independent collaborative research part funded by the NIHR Biomedical Research Centre at South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust and King’s College London. Publisher Copyright: © 2022, The Author(s).

King's Authors

Abstract

Parkinsonism secondary to viral infections is not an uncommon occurrence and has been brought under the spotlight with the spread of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. A variety of viruses have been described with a potential of inducing or contributing to the occurrence of parkinsonism and Parkinson’s disease (PD), although the relationship between the two remains a matter of debate originating with the description of encephalitis lethargica in the aftermath of the Spanish flu in 1918. While some viral infections have been linked to an increased risk for the development of PD, others seem to have a causal link with the occurrence of parkinsonism. Here, we review the currently available evidence on viral-induced parkinsonism with a focus on potential pathophysiological mechanisms and clinical features. We also review the evidence on viral infections as a risk factor for developing PD and the link between SARS-CoV-2 and parkinsonism, which might have important implications for future research and treatments.

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