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Were New Labour’s cultural policies neo-liberal?

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Were New Labour’s cultural policies neo-liberal? / Hesmondhalgh, David; Nisbett, Melissa; Oakley, Kate; Lee, David.

In: International journal of cultural policy, Vol. 21, No. 1, 01.01.2015, p. 97-114.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Hesmondhalgh, D, Nisbett, M, Oakley, K & Lee, D 2015, 'Were New Labour’s cultural policies neo-liberal?', International journal of cultural policy, vol. 21, no. 1, pp. 97-114. https://doi.org/10.1080/10286632.2013.879126

APA

Hesmondhalgh, D., Nisbett, M., Oakley, K., & Lee, D. (2015). Were New Labour’s cultural policies neo-liberal? International journal of cultural policy, 21(1), 97-114. https://doi.org/10.1080/10286632.2013.879126

Vancouver

Hesmondhalgh D, Nisbett M, Oakley K, Lee D. Were New Labour’s cultural policies neo-liberal? International journal of cultural policy. 2015 Jan 1;21(1):97-114. https://doi.org/10.1080/10286632.2013.879126

Author

Hesmondhalgh, David ; Nisbett, Melissa ; Oakley, Kate ; Lee, David. / Were New Labour’s cultural policies neo-liberal?. In: International journal of cultural policy. 2015 ; Vol. 21, No. 1. pp. 97-114.

Bibtex Download

@article{067289bc607640b292347bcba8d8f79a,
title = "Were New Labour{\textquoteright}s cultural policies neo-liberal?",
abstract = "This article assesses the cultural policies of {\textquoteleft}New Labour{\textquoteright}, the UK Labour government of 1997–2010. It takes neo-liberalism as its starting point, asking to what extent Labour{\textquoteright}s cultural policies can be validly and usefully characterised as neo-liberal. It explores this issue across three dimensions: corporate sponsorship and cuts in public subsidy; the running of public sector cultural institutions as though they were private businesses; and a shift in prevailing rationales for cultural policy, away from cultural justifications, and towards economic and social goals. Neo-liberalism is shown to be a significant but rather crude tool for evaluating and explaining New Labour{\textquoteright}s cultural policies. At worse, it falsely implies that New Labour did not differ from Conservative approaches to cultural policy, downplays the effect of sociocultural factors on policy-making, and fails to differentiate varying periods and directions of policy. It does, however, usefully draw attention to the public policy environment in which Labour operated, in particular the damaging effects of focusing, to an excessive degree, on economic conceptions of the good in a way that does not recognise the limitations of markets as a way of organising production, circulation and consumption.",
author = "David Hesmondhalgh and Melissa Nisbett and Kate Oakley and David Lee",
year = "2015",
month = jan,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1080/10286632.2013.879126",
language = "English",
volume = "21",
pages = "97--114",
journal = "International journal of cultural policy",
issn = "1028-6632",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "1",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Were New Labour’s cultural policies neo-liberal?

AU - Hesmondhalgh, David

AU - Nisbett, Melissa

AU - Oakley, Kate

AU - Lee, David

PY - 2015/1/1

Y1 - 2015/1/1

N2 - This article assesses the cultural policies of ‘New Labour’, the UK Labour government of 1997–2010. It takes neo-liberalism as its starting point, asking to what extent Labour’s cultural policies can be validly and usefully characterised as neo-liberal. It explores this issue across three dimensions: corporate sponsorship and cuts in public subsidy; the running of public sector cultural institutions as though they were private businesses; and a shift in prevailing rationales for cultural policy, away from cultural justifications, and towards economic and social goals. Neo-liberalism is shown to be a significant but rather crude tool for evaluating and explaining New Labour’s cultural policies. At worse, it falsely implies that New Labour did not differ from Conservative approaches to cultural policy, downplays the effect of sociocultural factors on policy-making, and fails to differentiate varying periods and directions of policy. It does, however, usefully draw attention to the public policy environment in which Labour operated, in particular the damaging effects of focusing, to an excessive degree, on economic conceptions of the good in a way that does not recognise the limitations of markets as a way of organising production, circulation and consumption.

AB - This article assesses the cultural policies of ‘New Labour’, the UK Labour government of 1997–2010. It takes neo-liberalism as its starting point, asking to what extent Labour’s cultural policies can be validly and usefully characterised as neo-liberal. It explores this issue across three dimensions: corporate sponsorship and cuts in public subsidy; the running of public sector cultural institutions as though they were private businesses; and a shift in prevailing rationales for cultural policy, away from cultural justifications, and towards economic and social goals. Neo-liberalism is shown to be a significant but rather crude tool for evaluating and explaining New Labour’s cultural policies. At worse, it falsely implies that New Labour did not differ from Conservative approaches to cultural policy, downplays the effect of sociocultural factors on policy-making, and fails to differentiate varying periods and directions of policy. It does, however, usefully draw attention to the public policy environment in which Labour operated, in particular the damaging effects of focusing, to an excessive degree, on economic conceptions of the good in a way that does not recognise the limitations of markets as a way of organising production, circulation and consumption.

U2 - 10.1080/10286632.2013.879126

DO - 10.1080/10286632.2013.879126

M3 - Article

VL - 21

SP - 97

EP - 114

JO - International journal of cultural policy

JF - International journal of cultural policy

SN - 1028-6632

IS - 1

ER -

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