What is the extent of reliability and validity evidence for screening tools for cognitive and behavioral change in people with ALS? A systematic review

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

6 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Objective: This systematic review provides an updated summary of the existing literature on the validity of screening tools for cognitive and behavioral impairment in people with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (pwALS), and also focuses on their reliability. Method: The following cognitive and behavioral screening tools were assessed in this review: the Edinburgh Cognitive and Behavioral ALS Screen (ECAS); the ALS Cognitive Behavioral Screen (ALS-CBS), the Mini Addenbrooke’s Cognitive Examination (Mini-ACE), the Beaumont Behavioral Interview (BBI); the MND Behavior Scale (MiND-B); and the ALS-FTD Questionnaire (ALS-FTD-Q). A search, using Medline, PsychINFO and Embase (21/09/2023), generated 37 results after exclusion criteria were applied. Evidence of internal consistency, item-total correlations, inter-rater reliability, clinical validity, convergent validity, and structural validity were extracted and assessed and risk of bias was evaluated. Results: The cognitive component of the ECAS was the tool with most evidence of reliability and validity for the assessment of cognitive impairment in ALS. It is well-suited to accommodate physical symptoms of ALS. For behavioral assessment, the BBI or ALS-FTD-Q had the most evidence of reliability and validity. The BBI is more thorough, but the ALS-FTD-Q is briefer. Conclusions: There is good but limited evidence for the reliability and validity of cognitive and behavioral screens. Further evidence of clinical and convergent validity would increase confidence in their clinical and research use.

Original languageEnglish
JournalAmyotrophic lateral sclerosis & frontotemporal degeneration
Early online date28 Feb 2024
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 28 Feb 2024

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'What is the extent of reliability and validity evidence for screening tools for cognitive and behavioral change in people with ALS? A systematic review'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this